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CNS complications of AIDS: CT and MR findings.




 

AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1988 Sep;151(3):449-54. Unique Identifier :

AIDS is now a common disease, seen daily in large metropolitan medical centers. Neuroimaging techniques such as CT and MR are critical to the detection and diagnosis of CNS complications. Intracerebral infections are common. These infections frequently are caused by opportunistic organisms; less commonly, they are bacterial infections. The cranial imaging features on CT and MR are not pathognomonic, but their distribution or appearance (e.g., asymmetric target lesions of toxoplasmosis) may have predictive value in a known AIDS patient. The superior contrast resolution of MR makes it a more sensitive cross-sectional imaging tool for evaluating intracerebral abnormalities associated with a variety of infectious processes. Differential diagnoses still include metastatic disease, lymphoma, and infarcts. When MR is used as the initial cross-sectional imaging study, contrast-enhanced CT may still be necessary to further characterize a lesion. Currently, more experience exists with CT for follow-up of the AIDS patient with CNS manifestations. MR, particularly with gadolinium-DTPA as a contrast medium, will probably become the imaging method of choice.

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/*COMPLICATIONS Brain/PATHOLOGY/RADIOGRAPHY Brain Diseases/COMPLICATIONS/*DIAGNOSIS/RADIOGRAPHY Brain Neoplasms/COMPLICATIONS/*DIAGNOSIS/RADIOGRAPHY Cryptococcosis/COMPLICATIONS/DIAGNOSIS/RADIOGRAPHY Cytomegalovirus Infections/COMPLICATIONS/DIAGNOSIS/RADIOGRAPHY Human Leukoencephalopathy, Progressive Multifocal/COMPLICATIONS/ DIAGNOSIS/RADIOGRAPHY Lymphoma/COMPLICATIONS/DIAGNOSIS/RADIOGRAPHY *Magnetic Resonance Imaging Mycoses/COMPLICATIONS/DIAGNOSIS/RADIOGRAPHY Opportunistic Infections/COMPLICATIONS/*DIAGNOSIS/RADIOGRAPHY Sarcoma, Kaposi's/COMPLICATIONS/DIAGNOSIS/RADIOGRAPHY *Tomography, X-Ray Computed JOURNAL ARTICLE REVIEW REVIEW, ACADEMIC



 




Information in this article was accurate in November 30, 1988. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.