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Zidovudine delays development of AIDS for patients with 4c-2, 3 and 4a HIV disease.




 

Int Conf AIDS. 1989 Jun 4-9;5:411 (abstract no. W.B.P.360). Unique

OBJECTIVE: To establish drug use patterns and the rate of progression to AIDS in a group of 4C-2, 3 and 4A patients treated with Zidovudine. METHOD: A group of patients was followed for at least 6 months in the Ontario Canada open Zidovudine treatment study: 136 4C-2 patients, 67 category 3 patients and 23 patients in category 4A. RESULTS: At a mean follow-up of 38.5 weeks, 75% of the sample remained on Zidovudine at full or reduced dose. On average, of each 100 days, patients received full dosage for 30 days, a reduced dose for 40 days and had therapy suspended for 30 days. The majority of dose reductions and discontinuations were due to drug-related hematologic toxicity. Eight patients experienced 4C-1 opportunistic infections (OIs): 6 developed PCP and 2 had CMV disease. One had died at follow-up. Patients with previous 4C-2 OIs had AIDS diagnosed at a mean of 249 days after the original minor OI. For the rest of the 4C-2 patients the mean number of days without major infection was 512. The following did not appear to be predictive of progression to AIDS: anemia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia or a severely depressed CD4 count at entry or the length of time at a reduced dose or time off Zidovudine. CONCLUSION: Progression to AIDS for 3.5% of the sample duplicates results of the initial placebo-controlled trial and is lower than rates obtained from historical controls. Of note is the fact that patients were at reduced dose or off the drug for 70% of the follow-up period. Further study is warranted to establish if a lower, less toxic dosage is, in fact, an efficacious one.

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/COMPLICATIONS/*PHYSIOPATHOLOGY CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes Human HIV Infections/COMPLICATIONS/*DRUG THERAPY/PHYSIOPATHOLOGY Leukocyte Count Opportunistic Infections/COMPLICATIONS Zidovudine/ADVERSE EFFECTS/*THERAPEUTIC USE ABSTRACT



 




Information in this article was accurate in September 30, 1990. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.