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NLM AIDSLINE

Pleural effusion and HIV infection in Kigali, Rwanda.




 

Int Conf AIDS. 1990 Jun 20-23;6(3):103 (abstract no. S.B.32). Unique

OBJECTIVE: To study the etiology of pleural effusions and their possible association with HIV infection. METHODS: From 09/14/88 to 10/16/89, each patient with pleural effusion had a medical history, physical examination, standard laboratory tests, chest X-ray, cyto-biochemical and microbiological pleural fluid analysis, needle biopsy of parietal pleura with histological and microbiological examination. Microbiological examination of sputum and HIV serology (Elisa, Western Blot) were carried out in a majority of patients. RESULTS: Pleural effusion was diagnosed in 127 patients (81 male/46 female; age: 19-74; mean: 34) Diagnoses and their respective association with HIV infection were the following: TABULAR DATA, SEE ABSTRACT VOLUME. CONCLUSIONS: At the CHK, pleural effusion is a common manifestation of tuberculosis, frequently associated with HIV infection. In areas with high prevalence for HIV and M. tuberculosis infection, pleural effusions in adults may be considered as a sign highly predictive of HIV infection.

Adult Aged AIDS Serodiagnosis Female Human HIV Infections/*COMPLICATIONS/DIAGNOSIS/PATHOLOGY Male Middle Age Neoplasms/DIAGNOSIS/PATHOLOGY Pleural Effusion/DIAGNOSIS/*ETIOLOGY/PATHOLOGY Prevalence Rwanda Sputum/MICROBIOLOGY Tuberculosis/COMPLICATIONS/DIAGNOSIS/PATHOLOGY ABSTRACT



 




Information in this article was accurate in December 30, 1990. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.