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Alpha-(1-3)- and alpha-(1-6)-D-mannose-specific plant lectins are markedly inhibitory to human immunodeficiency virus and cytomegalovirus infections in vitro.




 

Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1991 Mar;35(3):410-6. Unique Identifier :

The alpha-(1-3)-D-mannose- and alpha-(1-6)-D-mannose-specific agglutinins (lectins) from Galanthus nivalis, Hippeastrum hybrid, Narcissus pseudonarcissus, and Listera ovata inhibited infection of MT-4 cells by human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) and simian immunodeficiency virus at concentrations comparable to the concentrations at which dextran sulfate (molecular weight, 5,000 [DS-5000]) inhibits these viruses (50% effective concentration, 0.2 to 0.6 microgram/ml). Unlike DS-5000, however, the plant lectins did not inhibit the replication of other enveloped viruses, except for human cytomegalovirus (50% effective concentration, 0.9 to 1.6 microgram/ml). The plant lectins suppressed syncytium formation between persistently HIV-1- or HIV-2-infected HUT-78 cells and uninfected MOLT-4 (clone 8) cells at concentrations that were 5- to 10-fold lower than that required for DS-5000. Unlike DS-5000, however, the plant lectins did not inhibit HIV-1 binding to CD4+ cells. Combination of the plant lectins with DS-5000 led to a potent synergistic inhibition of HIV-1-induced cytopathogenicity in MT-4 cells and syncytium formation between HIV-infected HUT-78 cells and MOLT-4 cells. Our data suggest that alpha-(1-3)-D- and alpha-(1-6)-D-mannose-specific plant lectins interfere with an event in the HIV replicative cycle that is subsequent to the attachment of the virions to the cells (i.e., the fusion process).

Antibodies, Monoclonal/METABOLISM Antigens, CD4/IMMUNOLOGY Antiviral Agents/*PHARMACOLOGY Cells, Cultured Cytomegalovirus/*DRUG EFFECTS/METABOLISM Human HIV-1/*DRUG EFFECTS/METABOLISM Lectins/*PHARMACOLOGY Mannose/*PHARMACOLOGY Plant Extracts/PHARMACOLOGY Support, Non-U.S. Gov't SIV/*DRUG EFFECTS/METABOLISM JOURNAL ARTICLE



 




Information in this article was accurate in September 30, 1991. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.