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NLM AIDSLINE

The gene for B7, a costimulatory signal for T-cell activation, maps to chromosomal region 3q13.3-3q21.




 

Blood. 1992 Jan 15;79(2):489-94. Unique Identifier : AIDSLINE

B7 is an activation antigen expressed on activated B cells and gamma-interferon-stimulated monocytes. The B7 antigen is the natural ligand for CD28 on T cells. After engagement of T-cell receptor with antigen in association with major histocompatibility complex class II, a second signal mediated through the binding of B7 to CD28 greatly upregulates the production of multiple lymphokines. We have now mapped the B7 gene to human chromosome 3 using the technique of polymerase chain reaction on a panel of hamster x human somatic cell hybrid DNAs. We have further localized the gene to 3q13.3-3q21 using in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes. Trisomy of chromosome 3 is a recurrent chromosome change seen in various lymphomas and lymphoproliferative diseases, particularly diffuse, mixed, small, and large cell lymphomas, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I-induced adult T-cell leukemia, and angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. A number of chromosomal defects involving 3q21 have been described in acute myeloid leukemia and also in myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. The mapping of B7 may permit further insight into disease states associated with aberrant lymphocyte activation and lymphokine synthesis.

Animal Antigens, Surface/*GENETICS *B-Lymphocytes Base Sequence *Chromosome Mapping *Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3 DNA/CHEMISTRY Hamsters Human Hybrid Cells *Lymphocyte Transformation Molecular Sequence Data Nucleic Acid Hybridization Polymerase Chain Reaction Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S. *T-Lymphocytes JOURNAL ARTICLE



 




Information in this article was accurate in April 30, 1992. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.