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Does premorbid mental health, coping style or perceived social support predict survival in HIV positive gay men?




 

Int Conf AIDS. 1993 Jun 6-11;9(2):902 (abstract no. PO-D22-4108). Unique

OBJECTIVES: To determine if premorbid mental health, coping style or perceived social support predict survival in HIV positive gay men. METHODS: As part of a longitudinal cohort study designed to assess the psychological and behavioral impact of AIDS on New York's gay community, 746 men were interviewed in 1985. A subset n = 179) of asymptomatic men who tested HIV positive following a baseline interview were selected for the present analyses. These men did not know their HIV status at 1985 interview. Between 1986 and 1991, 74% of these men learned their HIV status. At six year follow-up, 106 men were still alive and 73 were known to have died due to AIDS-related illness. Psychological distress, coping strategies, and perceived social support availability and adequacy were measured in 1985. The mean scores of the two groups were compared. RESULTS: There were no mean differences between the two groups on any of the measures. The results suggest that premorbid psychological factors do not predict long term survival of HIV infected gay men.

*Adaptation, Psychological *Homosexuality/PSYCHOLOGY *HIV Infections/MORTALITY *HIV Seropositivity/PSYCHOLOGY



 




Information in this article was accurate in November 30, 1993. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.