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Activation associated lymphocyte death (AALD) in HIV-1+ patients is associated with the appearance of CD38+CD45RO+ and CD28- lymphocytes.




 

Int Conf AIDS. 1993 Jun 6-11;9(1):32 (abstract no. WS-A16-1). Unique

After in vitro stimulation lymphocytes from HIV-1 infected patients undergo activation associated lymphocyte (AALD) as shown by a decrease in the number of lymphoblasts recovered. In this study we have more closely investigated this phenomenon in relation to the atypical phenotypic features of lymphocytes from HIV-1+ patients. There was an overall increase in the number of CD38+ lymphocytes in patients due to an accumulation of cells with a novel CD8+CD38+CD45RO+ phenotype. This correlated negatively with the number of surviving blasts after PHA activation (r = -0.505, p < 0.001). This phenotype was also found to correlate well with other markers of disease progression such as serum levels of B-microglobulin and absolute CD4 counts. The expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD28 was also greatly reduced on CD3+ lymphocytes from HIV-1+ patients due to the accumulation of both a CD8+CD57+ population that does not normally express CD28 and a novel CD8+CD57-CD28- population. The expression of CD28 correlated well with the number of blasts recovered after PHA activation (r = 0.66, p < 0.001). Only CD28+ cells transformed into blasts while CD28- cells transiently expressed IL-2Ra but did not undergo blastogenesis as measured by cell size and Brdu incorporation. Studies in which both CD28 and CD38 were investigated revealed that within the CD8 compartment a CD38+CD28- phenotype provided the best correlation with poor blast recovery.

*Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/IMMUNOLOGY *Cell Death *HIV-1 *Lymphocyte Transformation *Lymphocytes/IMMUNOLOGY



 




Information in this article was accurate in November 30, 1993. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.