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NLM AIDSLINE

Mucosal immunization with a live, virulence-attenuated SIV vaccine elicits antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocytes and antibodies in rhesus macaques.




 

Symp Nonhum Primate Models AIDS. 1993 Sep 19-22;11:abstract no. 14.

An effective AIDS vaccine must protect against sexual transmission of HIV. Although intravenous (i.v.) inoculation with a molecularly cloned, live virulence-attenuated SIV (SIVmac1A11) provided durable protection against i.v. challenges with virulent SIVmac, intravaginal (IVAG) inoculation with SIVmac1A11 induced weak immune responses which did not prevent infection by IVAG challenge with virulent virus. To maximize genital and systemic antiviral immune responses generated by this live-attenuated vaccine, SVImac1A11 was inoculated into the vaginal sub-mucosa (VI) of four female rhesus macaques. Virus was isolated from PBMC of all animals at 1 week following the first immunization (p.i.) and all became aviremic by 8 weeks p.i. At 14 weeks p.i., monkeys were given a second immunization and remained aviremic. All monkeys seroconverted by 8 weeks after the first VI and had an anamnestic antibody response following the second VI. Secondary CTL were detected in all 4 monkeys by weeks 8 and 12 after the first VI. (see table below). However, there was no evidence of an anamnestic CTL response following the second VI. TABULAR DATA, SEE ABSTRACT VOLUME. Experiments are underway to determine whether immune responses elicited by this mucosal immunization strategy are associated with protection from intravaginal challenge with virulent SIVmac.

Administration, Intravaginal Animal Female Gene Products, env/*IMMUNOLOGY Macaca mulatta Mucous Membrane Retroviridae Proteins, Oncogenic/*IMMUNOLOGY Simian Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/*IMMUNOLOGY/*PREVENTION & CONTROL SIV/*IMMUNOLOGY/ISOLATION & PURIF T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/*IMMUNOLOGY Time Factors Vaccines, Attenuated/*ADMINISTRATION & DOSAGE Vagina Viral Fusion Proteins/*IMMUNOLOGY Viral Vaccines/*ADMINISTRATION & DOSAGE ABSTRACT



 




Information in this article was accurate in July 30, 1994. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.