Resource Logo
NLM AIDSLINE

Epidemiology and etiopathology of human T-lymphotropic viruses: diagnostic and clinical implications for non-endemic areas.




 

Tumori. 1994 Apr 30;80(2):88-100. Unique Identifier : AIDSLINE

Human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) type I and II were first described more than a decade ago. HTLV-I epidemiology and etiopathology are more defined than those of HTLV-II, but conflicting results have been obtained in seroepidemiologic surveys, mainly for difficulties in the discrimination between the two infections. The introduction of advanced serologic and molecular assays has recently provided sensitive and specific tools for diagnosis, and the epidemiologic and etiopathologic patterns linked to these retroviruses are being more precisely defined. Moreover, extensive nucleotide sequence analyses performed so far have mainly focused on HTLV-I isolates. The recent discovery of new HTLV-II endemic areas and the isolation of HTLV-II strains from intravenous drug users have finally provided the material for the molecular characterization of HTLV-II isolates, which is now a rapidly envolving field. We review the diagnostic strategies available and the etiologic associations reported so far for both viruses and also discuss the occurrence and significance of indeterminate serologic reactivities observed in both endemic and non-endemic areas.

Human *HTLV-BLV Infections/DIAGNOSIS/EPIDEMIOLOGY/MICROBIOLOGY Risk Factors Serodiagnosis Support, Non-U.S. Gov't JOURNAL ARTICLE REVIEW REVIEW, MULTICASE



 




Information in this article was accurate in September 30, 1994. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.