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NLM AIDSLINE

Sexual behavior, sexually transmitted diseases, male circumcision and risk of HIV infection among women in Nairobi, Kenya.




 

AIDS. 1994 Jan;8(1):93-9. Unique Identifier : AIDSLINE MED/94280710

OBJECTIVE: To study risk factors for HIV infection among women in Nairobi, Kenya, as the epidemic moves beyond high-risk groups. DESIGN: A cross-sectional case-control study among women attending two peri-urban family planning clinics. METHODS: A total of 4404 women were enrolled after giving written informed consent. Information on risk factors was obtained by interview using a structured questionnaire. Blood was taken for HIV and syphilis testing, and genital specimens for gonorrhea and trichomoniasis screening. RESULTS: Two hundred and sixteen women (4.9%; 95% confidence interval, 4.3-5.5) were HIV-1-positive. Although risk of HIV was significantly increased among unmarried women and among women with multiple sex partners, most seropositive women were married and reported only a single sex partner in the last year. Women with a history or current evidence of sexually transmitted disease were at significantly increased risk; however, the prevalence of these exposures was low. Women whose husband or usual sex partner was uncircumcised had a threefold increase in risk of HIV, and this risk was present in almost all strata of potential confounding factors. Only 5.2% of women reported ever having used a condom. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that, among women who are not in high-risk groups, risk of HIV infection is largely determined by their male partner's behavior and circumcision status. Interventions designed to change male sexual behavior are urgently needed.

Adolescence Adult *Circumcision Cross-Sectional Studies Female Human HIV Infections/*EPIDEMIOLOGY/ETIOLOGY Kenya/EPIDEMIOLOGY Male Middle Age Risk Factors *Sex Behavior Sexually Transmitted Diseases/*EPIDEMIOLOGY Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S. JOURNAL ARTICLE



 




Information in this article was accurate in September 30, 1994. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.