Resource Logo
NLM AIDSLINE

The effects of HIV-2 infection in a rural area of Guinea-Bissau.




 

AIDS. 1994 Jul;8(7):977-82. Unique Identifier : AIDSLINE MED/95032930

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical and immunologic effects, and pattern of mortality associated with HIV-2 infection. SETTING: A rural community in Guinea-Bissau. METHODS: Serologic screening of 2774 subjects aged > 14 years followed by studies of the prevalence of clinical and immunologic abnormalities among 133 subjects with HIV-2 infection and 160 seronegative controls, and surveillance of mortality among all subjects who were screened during a mean of 2 years of follow-up. RESULTS: Generalized lymphadenopathy was the only clinical abnormality significantly associated with HIV-2 infection. Infection was associated with lower CD4 counts and higher beta 2-microglobulin and neopterin levels. During follow-up, 5.5% of infected subjects died compared with 1.8% of the seronegatives (rate ratio adjusted for age and sex, 3.5; 95% confidence interval ((CI), 1.8-6.7). Proportional hazard regression analysis showed that the rate ratio varied with age (P = 0.003) and there was some evidence that the excess of mortality in infected subjects was, in absolute terms, least in the oldest subjects (trend test; P = 0.08). CONCLUSIONS: The findings support previous suggestions that HIV-2 is less pathogenic than HIV-1; the data also suggest that mortality associated with infection may be lower in older subjects.

beta 2-Microglobulin/ANALYSIS Adolescence Adult Age Factors Aged Biopterin/ANALOGS & DERIVATIVES/BLOOD CD4 Lymphocyte Count Female Follow-Up Studies Guinea-Bissau/EPIDEMIOLOGY Human HIV Infections/BLOOD/*IMMUNOLOGY/MORTALITY *HIV Seroprevalence *HIV-2 Male Middle Age Rural Population/STATISTICS & NUMER DATA JOURNAL ARTICLE



 




Information in this article was accurate in February 28, 1995. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.