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NLM AIDSLINE

Does symptomatic primary HIV-1 infection accelerate progression to CDC stage IV disease, CD4 count below 200 x 10(6)/l, AIDS, and death from AIDS?




 

BMJ. 1994 Dec 10;309(6968):1535-7. Unique Identifier : AIDSLINE

OBJECTIVE--To investigate the prognostic significance of symptomatic primary HIV-1 infection. DESIGN--Prospective study of homosexual men seroconverting to HIV in 1985 and 1986. Patients were followed up at least three times yearly with clinical examinations and T cell subset determinations for an average of 7.2 years. SETTING--Research project centred on attenders for treatment and screening for HIV at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm. SUBJECTS--19 patients presenting with a glandular-fever-like illness associated with seroconversion to HIV and 29 asymptomatic seroconverters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Progression to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stage IV disease, CD4 cell count below 200 x 10(6)/l, AIDS, and death from AIDS. RESULTS--Symptomatic seroconverters were significantly more likely to develop Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stage IV disease (95% v 66%), CD4 cell counts below 200 x 10(6)/l (84% v 55%), and AIDS (58% v 28%) and die of AIDS (53% v 7%). CONCLUSION--A glandular-fever-like illness associated with seroconversion to HIV-1 predicts accelerated progression to AIDS and other HIV related diseases.

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/IMMUNOLOGY/MORTALITY Adult Aged CD4 Lymphocyte Count Disease Progression Follow-Up Studies Homosexuality, Male Human HIV Infections/IMMUNOLOGY/*MORTALITY HIV Seropositivity *HIV-1 Male Middle Age Prognosis Prospective Studies Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Sweden/EPIDEMIOLOGY T-Lymphocyte Subsets T-Lymphocytopenia, Idiopathic CD4-Positive/IMMUNOLOGY/MORTALITY JOURNAL ARTICLE



 




Information in this article was accurate in April 30, 1995. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.