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Female genital schistosomiasis as a risk-factor for the transmission of HIV.




 

Int J STD AIDS. 1994 Sep-Oct;5(5):368-72. Unique Identifier : AIDSLINE

Sexually transmitted diseases increase the probability for HIV transmission, presumably through lesions in the genital mucosa. Female genital schistosomiasis, a special form of urinary schistosomiasis due to infection with Schistosoma haematobium, may be another risk-factor for transmission of HIV. From published data there seem to be pathophysiological, immunological and epidemiological evidence for an association between genital ulcer disease due to S. haematobium and HIV-infection in women. Female genital schistosomiasis could be seen as an example of how an interaction between a parasitic disease and HIV facilitates the propagation of the latter. As long as the prevalence of HIV is low in the general population, interventions targeted to high risk groups will significantly delay, or even prevent, widespread dissemination of the HIV infection in the rest of the population. If female genital schistosomiasis is a risk factor for the spread of HIV like other genital ulcer diseases, there should be interesting ways to intervene from the public health point of view.

Adolescence Adult Africa/EPIDEMIOLOGY Female Genital Diseases, Female/*COMPLICATIONS/EPIDEMIOLOGY/IMMUNOLOGY/ PHYSIOPATHOLOGY Human HIV Infections/*EPIDEMIOLOGY/ETIOLOGY/PREVENTION & CONTROL/ *TRANSMISSION Male *Population Surveillance Prevalence Public Health Risk Factors Schistosomiasis haematobia/*COMPLICATIONS/EPIDEMIOLOGY/ PHYSIOPATHOLOGY Support, Non-U.S. Gov't JOURNAL ARTICLE REVIEW REVIEW, TUTORIAL



 




Information in this article was accurate in April 30, 1995. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.