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The impact of initiation or change in antiretroviral therapy on HIV plasma RNA load as measured by bDNA assay.




 

3rd Conf Retro and Opportun Infect. 1996 Jan 28-Feb 1;:155. Unique

Objectives: (1) To assess the impact of initiation or change in antiretroviral therapy (ARVT) on HIV plasma RNA load as measured by bDNA assay during the first 8 weeks after beginning or changing ARVT; and (2) to determine the optimal time to obtain bDNA assays to assess if there has been an effect of ARVT on HIV plasma RNA load. Methods: 92 HIV-infected patients (PtS) were enrolled into three strata: S1 -29 pts who had less than 50/mm(3) CD4 cells who were switching or adding ARVT; S2- 31 pts who had between 50 - 500hnm 3 CD4 cells who were switching or adding ARVT; and S3 - 32 pts who were ARVT-naive who had decided to begin ARVT. bDNA assays were performed at baseline and at 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks thereafter. Results: Of the 92 pts enrolled, 88 were evaluable. 16 pts had virus below detection (less than 10(4) Eq/ml) at baseline (0/28 pts in S1,11/31 pts in S2 and 5/29 pts in S3). These pts were censored from subsequent analysis. Baseline median viral copy numbers were 171,000 Eq/ml in S1, 68,015 Eq/ml in S2 and 104,605 Eq/ml in S3. Using the composite endpoint of a 1-log drop or decrease to below the detectable limit, the proportion of pts in each stratum achieving the endpoint is shown below. Of the 32 pts who achieved the endpoint, 23 (72%) did so by Week 1. (table:see text). Conclusions: Of those responding to initiation or change in ARVT, significant viral load reduction occured at week 1. Pts with CD4 less than 50/mm3, often excluded from ARV trials empirically, experienced similar reductions in HIV copy number to pts with higher CD4 counts following changes in antiretroviral therapy.

Antiviral Agents/*THERAPEUTIC USE CD4 Lymphocyte Count DNA, Viral/*BLOOD HIV Infections/BLOOD/*DRUG THERAPY HIV-1/GENETICS/*ISOLATION & PURIF Human RNA, Viral/*BLOOD ABSTRACT



 




Information in this article was accurate in November 30, 1996. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.