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NLM AIDSLINE

COUP-TF and Sp1 interact and cooperate in the transcriptional activation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat in human microglial cells.




 

J Biol Chem. 1997 Dec 5;272(49):31149-55. Unique Identifier : AIDSLINE

We have recently reported that chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) activates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gene transcription in glial and neuronal cells. Here, we have examined the role of COUP-TF in microglial cells, the major target cells for HIV-1 infection in brain. We show that COUP-TF activates gene expression from both the lymphotropic LAI and the macrophage-tropic JR-FL HIV-1 strains. Although COUP-TF binds to the 352/-320 nuclear receptor responsive element of the long terminal repeat, it functions as a transcriptional activator by acting on the 68/+29 minimal promoter. This region is a direct target of transcription factors Sp1 and Sp3. We report the discovery and features of a physical and functional interplay between COUP-TF and Sp1. Our cotransfection experiments provide evidence for a functional synergism between Sp1 and COUP-TF leading to enhanced transcriptional activity of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat through the Sp1 element. In contrast, Sp3 functions as a repressor of Sp1- or COUP-TF-induced activation. We further demonstrate that COUP-TF and Sp1 are capable of physically interacting, via the DNA-binding domain of COUP-TF, in vitro and in the cell. These findings reveal how the novel interplay of Sp1 and COUP-TF families of transcription factors regulate HIV-1 gene expression.

*DNA-Binding Proteins/METABOLISM *HIV Long Terminal Repeat/GENETICS *Microglia/VIROLOGY *Trans-Activation (Genetics) *Transcription Factor, Sp1/METABOLISM *Transcription Factors/METABOLISM



 




Information in this article was accurate in March 30, 1998. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.