Resource Logo
NLM AIDSLINE

ACTG 260: a randomized, phase I-II, dose-ranging trial of the anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity of delavirdine monotherapy. The AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 260 Team.




 

Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1999 Jun;43(6):1373-8. Unique Identifier :

ACTG 260 was an open-label, four-arm trial designed to study the safety and anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) activity of delavirdine monotherapy at three ranges of concentrations in plasma compared to those of control therapy with zidovudine or didanosine. Delavirdine doses were adjusted weekly until subjects were within their target trough concentration range (3 to 10, 11 to 30, or 31 to 50 microM). A total of 113 subjects were analyzed. At week 2, the mean HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RNA level declines among the subjects in the three delavirdine arms were similar (0.87, 1.08, and 1.02 log10 for the low, middle, and high target arms, respectively), but by week 8, the subjects in the pooled delavirdine arms showed only a 0.10 log10 reduction. In the subjects in the nucleoside arm, mean HIV-1 RNA level reductions at weeks 2 and 8 were 0.67 and 0.55 log10, respectively. Because viral suppression by delavirdine was not maintained, the trial was stopped early. Rash, which was usually self-limited, developed in 36% of subjects who received delavirdine. Delavirdine monotherapy has potent anti-HIV activity at 2 weeks, but its activity is time limited due to the rapid emergence of drug resistance.

CLINICAL TRIAL CLINICAL TRIAL, PHASE I CLINICAL TRIAL, PHASE II JOURNAL ARTICLE RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/*DRUG THERAPY/VIROLOGY Adult Anti-HIV Agents/*THERAPEUTIC USE CD4 Lymphocyte Count Delavirdine/ADVERSE EFFECTS/BLOOD/*THERAPEUTIC USE Dose-Response Relationship, Drug Female Human *HIV-1/GENETICS Male RNA, Viral/BLOOD Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.



 




Information in this article was accurate in August 30, 1999. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.