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Treatment of mucocutaneous herpes simplex virus infections unresponsive to acyclovir with topical foscarnet cream in AIDS patients: a phase I/II study.




 

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 1999 Aug 1;21(4):301-6. Unique Identifier :

The efficacy and toxicity of foscarnet cream for the treatment of mucocutaneous herpes simplex virus lesions or lesions that were clinically unresponsive to systemic acyclovir treatment (median, 30.5 days) in AIDS patients were studied in a phase I/II, open-label, nonrandomized multicenter trial. In the study, 20 patients with advanced stages of AIDS were treated with foscarnet 1% cream five times a day for a mean duration of 34.5 days. Response of index lesions (n = 20) was judged to be completely healed (8 lesions), excellent (4 lesions), or good (1 lesion) in 65% of lesions. The median time to first negative herpes simplex virus culture of index lesion was 8 days. Among 15 patients with pain at baseline, 11 had complete resolution of pain and 2 had at least a 50% reduction. Clinical adverse events included skin ulceration (4 patients), application site reactions (3 patients), fever (3 patients), and headache (3 patients). Five (25%) patients developed new lesions due to herpes simplex virus at sites other than those being treated topically while enrolled in the study. Topical foscarnet 1% cream appears to be a safe and effective treatment for acyclovir-unresponsive mucocutaneous herpes simplex virus infection in AIDS patients.

CLINICAL TRIAL CLINICAL TRIAL, PHASE I CLINICAL TRIAL, PHASE II JOURNAL ARTICLE MULTICENTER STUDY Acyclovir/THERAPEUTIC USE Administration, Topical Adult Antiviral Agents/*ADMINISTRATION & DOSAGE/ADVERSE EFFECTS AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections/*DRUG THERAPY Drug Eruptions/ETIOLOGY Drug Resistance, Microbial Female Foscarnet/*ADMINISTRATION & DOSAGE/ADVERSE EFFECTS Herpes Simplex/*COMPLICATIONS/*DRUG THERAPY Human Male Middle Age Safety Skin Ulcer/CHEMICALLY INDUCED Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.



 




Information in this article was accurate in October 30, 1999. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.