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NLM AIDSLINE

[White-noise field campimetry in HIV+ patients]




 

Ophthalmologe. 1999 Jul;96(7):437-42. Unique Identifier : AIDSLINE

PURPOSE: The first morphological changes in eyes with HIV infection are microvascular disease of the retina with cotton-wool spots and microaneurysms. The study was performed to find out if evidence of disturbances of ocular microcirculation can be established by non-invasive methods. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with HIV infection and without opportunistic infections underwent thorough ophthalmologic examination with threshold-oriented, suprathreshold perimetry (TAP 2000 ct, Oculus) and white-noise field campimetry (TEC, Oculus). RESULTS: Visual field examination was normal in 23 out of 27 patients (85%), whereas 4 patients showed relative field defects in at least one eye. In white-noise field campimetry 13 out of 23 perimetrically unaffected patients (56%) perceived scotomas in one or both eyes. These scotomas were not stable. Three of 4 patients with relative scotomas in the visual field had cotton-wool spots in the retina and showed a stable scotoma in campimetry. Visual acuity, IOP, and cup/disc ratio were within normal ranges. CONCLUSION: White-noise field campimetry complements the standard examination of patients with HIV and might be capable of indicating disturbances of ocular microcirculation by a non-invasive method before morphological changes in the retina can be seen.

JOURNAL ARTICLE Adult Aneurysm/DIAGNOSIS/PHYSIOPATHOLOGY English Abstract Female Fluorescein Angiography Human HIV Seropositivity/*DIAGNOSIS/PHYSIOPATHOLOGY Male Microcirculation/PHYSIOPATHOLOGY Perimetry/*INSTRUMENTATION Retinal Diseases/*DIAGNOSIS/PHYSIOPATHOLOGY Retinal Vessels/PHYSIOPATHOLOGY Scotoma/DIAGNOSIS/PHYSIOPATHOLOGY Visual Fields/PHYSIOLOGY



 




Information in this article was accurate in December 30, 1999. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.