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Coinfection of visceral leishmaniasis and Mycobacterium in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.




 

Arch Pathol Lab Med. 1999 Sep;123(9):835-7. Unique Identifier : AIDSLINE

We report a case of coinfection of visceral leishmaniasis and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare in the same lesions in the small bowel and bone marrow of a 33-year-old man with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who complained of abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea. The duodenal mucosa and bone marrow biopsy specimens showed numerous foamy macrophages packed with two forms of microorganisms that were identified histologically and ultrastructurally as Leishmania and Mycobacterium species. Visceral leishmaniasis is rarely suspected in patients residing in nonendemic countries including the United States. It should be included in the differential diagnosis for opportunistic infection in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. An appropriate travel history is important. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case showing coinfection of visceral leishmaniasis and Mycobacterium avium-intracelluulare in the same lesion in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

JOURNAL ARTICLE Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/*COMPLICATIONS Adult Animal AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections/*DIAGNOSIS/MICROBIOLOGY/ PARASITOLOGY Biopsy Bone Marrow/MICROBIOLOGY/PATHOLOGY/PARASITOLOGY Case Report Human Intestinal Mucosa/MICROBIOLOGY/PATHOLOGY/PARASITOLOGY/ ULTRASTRUCTURE Intestine, Small/MICROBIOLOGY/PATHOLOGY/PARASITOLOGY/ ULTRASTRUCTURE Leishmaniasis, Visceral/COMPLICATIONS/*DIAGNOSIS/PATHOLOGY Macrophages/MICROBIOLOGY/PARASITOLOGY/ULTRASTRUCTURE Male Microscopy, Electron Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection/COMPLICATIONS/ *DIAGNOSIS/PATHOLOGY



 




Information in this article was accurate in December 30, 1999. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.