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Researchers from National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) Provide Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of HIV/AIDS




 



2012 OCT 22 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at AIDS Weekly -- Investigators discuss new findings in Immune System Diseases and Conditions. According to news reporting out of Montpellier, France, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "Macrophages, which are CD4 and CCR5 positive, can sustain HIV-1 replication for long periods of time. Thus, these cells play critical roles in the transmission, dissemination and persistence of viral infection."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), "Of note, current antiviral therapies do not target macrophages efficiently. Previously, it was demonstrated that interactions between CCR5 and gp120 stimulate PKC. However, the PKC isozymes involved were not identified. In this study, we identified PKC-delta as a major cellular cofactor for HIV-1 replication in macrophages. Indeed, PKC-delta was stimulated following the interaction between the virus and its target cell. Moreover, inhibition of PKC-delta blocked the replication of R5-tropic viruses in primary human macrophages. However, this inhibition did not have significant effects on receptor and co-receptor expression or fusion. Additionally, it did not affect the formation of the early reverse transcription product containing R/U5 sequences, but did inhibit the synthesis of subsequent cDNAs. Importantly, the inhibition of PKC-delta altered the redistribution of actin, a cellular cofactor whose requirement for the completion of reverse transcription was previously established. It also prevented the association of the reverse transcription complex with the cytoskeleton."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This work highlights the importance of PKC-delta during early steps of the replicative cycle of HIV-1 in human macrophages."

For more information on this research see: Protein kinase C-delta regulates HIV-1 replication at an early post-entry step in macrophages. Retrovirology, 2012;9():1-11. Retrovirology can be contacted at: Biomed Central Ltd, 236 Grays Inn Rd, Floor 6, London WC1X 8HL, England. (BioMed Central - www.biomedcentral.com/; Retrovirology - www.retrovirology.com)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting X. Contreras, IGH, UPR1142, CNRS, F-34090 Montpellier, France (see also Immune System Diseases and Conditions).

Keywords for this news article include: France, Europe, HIV/AIDS, Immunology, Proteomics, Montpellier, Macrophages, RNA Viruses, Retroviridae, Myeloid Cells, HIV Infections, Vertebrate Viruses, Primate Lentiviruses, Enzymes and Coenzymes, Protein Kinase C-delta, Connective Tissue Cells, Mononuclear Phagocyte System, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2012, NewsRx LLC



 


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Information in this article was accurate in October 22, 2012. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.