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Research Data from National Institute for Communicable Diseases Update Understanding of HIV/AIDS




 



2013 MAY 6 (NewsRx) -- By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at AIDS Weekly -- Investigators discuss new findings in Immune System Diseases and Conditions. According to news reporting originating from Johannesburg, South Africa, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Broadly cross-neutralizing (BCN) antibodies are likely to be critical for an effective HIV vaccine. However, the ontogeny of such antibodies and their relationship with autologous viral evolution is unclear."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from National Institute for Communicable Diseases, "Here, we characterized viral evolution in CAP256, a subtype C-infected individual who developed potent BCN antibodies targeting positions R166 and K169 in the V2 region. CAP256 was superinfected at 3 months postinfection with a virus that was highly sensitive to BCN V2-dependent monoclonal antibodies. The autologous neutralizing response in CAP256 was directed at V1V2, reaching extremely high titers (>1:40,000) against the superinfecting virus at 42 weeks, just 11 weeks prior to the development of the BCN response targeting the same region. Recombination between the primary and superinfecting viruses, especially in V2 and gp41, resulted in two distinct lineages by 4 years postinfection. Although neutralization of some CAP256 clones by plasma from as much as 2 years earlier suggested incomplete viral escape, nonetheless titers against later clones were reduced at least 40-fold to less than 1:1,000. Escape mutations were identified in each lineage, either at R166 or at K169, suggesting that strain-specific and BCN antibodies targeted overlapping epitopes. Furthermore, the early dependence of CAP256 neutralizing antibodies on the N160 glycan decreased with the onset of neutralization breadth, indicating a change in specificity. These data suggest rapid maturation, within 11 weeks, of CAP256 strain-specific antibodies to acquire breadth, with implications for the vaccine elicitation of BCN V2-dependent antibodies."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Overall these studies demonstrate that ongoing viral escape is possible, even from BCN antibodies."

For more information on this research see: Multiple Pathways of Escape from HIV Broadly Cross-Neutralizing V2-Dependent Antibodies. The Journal of Virology, 2013;87(9):4882-94 (see also Immune System Diseases and Conditions).

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting P.L. Moore, Centre for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Services, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Keywords for this news article include: Antibodies, Genetics, HIV/AIDS, Virology, Immunology, RNA Viruses, Johannesburg, South Africa, Retroviridae, Blood Proteins, HIV Infections, Viral Vaccines, Immunoglobulins, Vertebrate Viruses, Primate Lentiviruses, Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, Viral Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

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Information in this article was accurate in May 6, 2013. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.