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LEAD: The first charity bridge event in the New York metropolitan area to designate AIDS patients as its beneficiaries was played Sept. 24 at the Grand Bridge Studio, Franklin Square, L.I., and will be repeated next year. Most of the top-ranked Long Island players took part in a partly Pro-Am format, and since the playing space was donated and the directors were volunteers, virtually all the income of $3,500 went to the People with AIDS Coalition of Long Island.

The first charity bridge event in the New York metropolitan area to designate AIDS patients as its beneficiaries was played Sept. 24 at the Grand Bridge Studio, Franklin Square, L.I., and will be repeated next year. Most of the top-ranked Long Island players took part in a partly Pro-Am format, and since the playing space was donated and the directors were volunteers, virtually all the income of $3,500 went to the People with AIDS Coalition of Long Island.

The winners were Howard Chandross of Long Beach, L.I., and Mary Bond of Rockville Centre, L.I. The runners-up were Reisha Berkowsky of Dix Hills, L.I., and Joan Asheroff of Babylon, L.I.

On the diagramed deal from the event, accurate slam exploration is difficult for a regular partnership after East has opened three hearts and South has bid three no-trump. There were certainly some grand slam chances, and North might have made a cue-bid of four hearts.

But for a variety of reasons Chandross as North took a direct shot at six no-trump, a good practical choice. There was little chance of making an accurate judgment about a grand slam. The opening pre-emptive bid suggested bad breaks. It was likely that South held a double stopper in hearts. And there was a good possibility that playing in no-trump would be profitable in terms of match points.

A heart was led to the jack, king and ace. When the diamond finesse succeeded, Bond began to think that she had missed a grand slam, but the bad spade break held her to 12 tricks.

This was a top score, because nearly all the North-South pairs played in spades, usually in game. The maximum in a spade contract was 12 tricks, and even that was not easy to achieve if East did not open the bidding and so pinpoint the location of the heart king.

The district North American Pair Championship playoffs, played Saturday in New Windsor, N.Y., qualified these pairs for the national finals in Fort Worth in March: Open Division - first, Steve Weinstein, Upper Montclair, N.J., and Fred Stewart, Accord, N.Y.; second, Rosalind Elk, New Milford, N.J., and Frank Neff, Clifton, N.J.; third, Bill and Rozanne Pollack, Englewood Cliffs, N.J. Nonlife Master Division - first, Robert and Diane Stites, Westfield, N.J.; second, Scott McCabe and Robert Pritzlaff Jr., Highland, N.Y.; third, Kirti Patel, Glen Rock, N.J., and Arnold Bergen, Oakland, N.J.



 


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Information in this article was accurate in December 6, 1989. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.