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Salmonella outbreak sickens nearly 300 in US




 

WASHINGTON, Oct 09, 2013 (AFP) - An outbreak of salmonella in raw chicken has sickened nearly 300 people in the United States, officials said Wednesday as consumer advocates warned the federal shutdown was hampering a government
response.

   The 278 illnesses in 18 states were believed to be linked to raw chicken from three Foster Farms locations in California, according to the Food Safety Inspection Service.

   "The outbreak is still ongoing, and therefore our investigation is still ongoing," a spokesman for FSIS told AFP, noting that 135 inspectors were on duty responding to the outbreak despite the government shutdown.

   "The only folks that were furloughed were back at our headquarters," he said.

   The shutdown, which began October 1, has sent hundreds of thousands of federal workers home without pay, including staff at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration.

   It is the first shutdown in 17 years and was driven by a resurgence of Republican opposition to President Barack Obama's healthcare reform law passed in 2010.

   According to US media reports, the CDC on Tuesday recalled some of its staff to re-open a network of public health labs that monitor for food-borne outbreaks.

   An AFP call for comment to the CDC was not immediately returned.

   The FDA has warned it would "be unable to support the majority of its food safety, nutrition, and cosmetics activities."

   "The shutdown has really handcuffed these regulatory agencies and their proper regulatory role," Eric Walker, spokesman for Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, told AFP.

   "This is the nightmare scenario, not just with the government shutdown but this is what happens when you overuse antibiotics in livestock."

   A high proportion of people have been hospitalized -- 42 percent -- and some of the salmonella strains are showing resistance to antibiotics, according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest.

   The consumer advocacy group also noted that seven strains of salmonella appear to be responsible for the sicknesses.

   "The number of people we know to be ill is just the tip of the iceberg," said CSPI food safety director Caroline Smith DeWaal.

   "This outbreak shows that is a terrible time for government public health officials to be locked out of their offices and labs, and for government Web sites to go dark."

   Foster Farms said in a statement that no recall is in effect and that "products are safe to consume if properly handled and cooked."

   The company also said it had "instituted a number of additional food safety practices," that have been shown in the past to control salmonella.

   "Salmonella is naturally occurring in poultry and can be fully eradicated if raw product is properly handled and fully cooked," said Robert O'Connor, Foster Farms' food safety chief and head veterinarian.

   The FSIS warned that salmonella infections "can be life-threatening, especially to those with weak immune systems, such as infants, the elderly and persons with HIV infection or undergoing chemotherapy."

   Common symptoms include diarrhea, stomach cramps and fever within eight to 72 hours of consuming infected food. Illness including nausea, chills and headache may persist for up to a week.



 


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Information in this article was accurate in October 9, 2013. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.