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CDC HIV/AIDS/Viral Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update

VIETNAM: Alcohol Abuse Linked with Poor Adherence in HIV/AIDS Patients




 

Pharmacy Times (02.19.2014) Aids Weekly Plus

Pharmacy Times reported on a study that linked alcohol abuse with nonadherence to HIV/AIDS therapy. The researchers conducted a cross-sectional survey with 468 drug users and 648 nondrug users from seven clinics in Vietnam to investigate the relationship between alcohol use disorders, antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence, and health-related quality of life among HIV/AIDS patients. Results showed that 35 percent of drug users and 25. 9 percent of nondrug users were hard drinkers. Of the drug users, approximately 22 percent were binge drinkers and 25.9 percent had poor ART adherence. Binge drinkers and those at risk were twice as likely to have poor adherence as those participants who did not use alcohol. The hazardous drinkers or binge drinkers had lower quality-of-life scores than safe drinkers. The researchers suggest screening and interventions to help alcohol abusers improve their ART adherence. The full report, “Associations Between Alcohol Use Disorders and Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment and Quality of Life Amongst People Living with HIV/AIDS,” was published in the journal BMC Public Health (2014; doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-27).



 


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Information in this article was accurate in February 20, 2014. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.