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Health Department Investigating Invasive Meningococcal Disease Cases Among Gay Men and Men Who Have Sex with Men




 

Four cases of invasive meningococcal disease diagnosed in past four weeks; men experiencing high fever, headache, stiff neck and rash are advised to immediately contact their health care providers

September 27, 2012 – The Health Department is currently investigating a cluster of invasive meningococcal disease, commonly known as meningitis, among gay men and men who have sex with men. Invasive meningococcal disease is a severe bacterial infection that has a high fatality rate. Within the past four weeks, there have been four cases; one died and one person is in critical care. The cases are spread across several boroughs and among men ages 31 to 42 years old.

The most recent four cases have all been among HIV infected men. People living with HIV are at a greater risk than the general population of acquiring invasive meningococcal disease and if infected, dying from infection. This disease is spread by prolonged close contact with nose or throat discharges from an infected person. Examples of prolonged contact include living in the same household or intimate activities, including kissing and sexual contact.

Common symptoms of meningitis are high fever, headache, stiff neck and rash that develop rapidly within 2 days. People that have been in prolonged close contact with infected people need to see their health care provider immediately to receive preventive antibiotics. Symptoms may occur 2 to 10 days after exposure, but usually within 5 days. People who experience symptoms should seek medical care immediately.

Frequently Asked Questions on Invasive Meningococcal Disease (PDF)



 


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Information in this article was accurate in September 27, 2012. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.