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CDC HIV/AIDS/Viral Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update

UNITED STATES: A Likely Uptick in PrEP Users as Studies Seek New Answers




 

AIDSmeds (02.03.2014) Aids Weekly Plus

AIDSmeds reported that an essay in the Lancet points to an increase in the use of the pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) Truvada (tenofovir/emtricitabine) to prevent HIV-negative people from acquiring the infection. The essay reports that only 1,774 people used the drug between January 2011 and March 2013; however, healthcare providers issued 20 percent of new prescriptions in the first three months of 2013, which indicates an upsurge in people seeking to use it. Due to questions, concerns, and controversies about the application of the drug, several clinical trials are researching toxicity and non-adherence of Truvada as PrEP. However, it is still believed that many of those enrolled in the studies will want to continue with the drug after the trials have ended. Other studies are researching the effectiveness of Truvada at less-than-daily dosage, as well as studying whether men who have sex with men (MSM) are increasing their high-risk activities due to a perception that using a PrEP will protect them from acquiring HIV. The full report, “Uptake of PrEP for HIV Slow Among MSM,” was published in the journal the Lancet (2014; 383 (9915): 399–400).



 


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Information in this article was accurate in February 4, 2014. The state of the art may have changed since the publication date. This material is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between you and your doctor. Always discuss treatment options with a doctor who specializes in treating HIV.