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CDC HIV/AIDS/Viral Hepatitis/STD/TB Prevention News Update
GHANA: Kasapreko Company Limited Supports HIV/AIDS Patients
Innocent Samuel Appiaih
January 2, 2013
ghanaweb.com (12.30.12)

Kasapreko Company Limited (KCL), producers of alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages in Ghana, pledged to continue its support of people living with HIV/AIDS, especially those at Matthew 25 House in Koforidua, and to help eliminate the stigmatization they experience because of the disease. Matthew 25 House is a non-governmental organization (NGO) in Ghana, established in 1998 to help persons infected and affected by HIV/AIDS regardless of race, tribe, or religious and political beliefs. It provides: care and support for persons with HIV as well as orphans and vulnerable children; sexual education programs for youth in certain institutions; education and communication materials to the general public; and skill training for women and youth. The NGO’s name is derived from its mission statement, which is based on Matthew 25:31-40 of the New Testament. KCL Marketing Manager Clarence Amenyah stated that the beverage producer first encountered Matthew 25 House when it sent a letter to KCL requesting support for its annual Christmas soup kitchen. KCL management immediately recognized the worth of supporting the NGO and took the opportunity to ensure that the inmates had a memorable Christmas celebration. KCL management and staff provided almost everything needed for the event, including the food, entertainment, and transportation. KCL staff and management also donated funds to the house for the inmates’ continued upkeep as well as the purchase of household items, food items, and clothing. Amenyah stated that the company was keen to support health-related programs and that it would also extend support to those caring for persons with HIV/AIDS. He noted that supporting the event helped reinforce the truth that “people living with HIV/AIDS are also human beings” and that “there is no way society can eliminate them.” He condemned the disturbing stigmatization of these patients, noting in particular that wage earners can automatically lose their jobs if they become infected with HIV. Amenyah appealed to the general public to get tested and know their status. He said that what KCL did for Matthew 25 House was to publicize the state of affairs of its inmates; let other corporate entities know that help was needed and that it was not bad to help improve the lives of persons with HIV/AIDS; and inform Ghanaians that people living with HIV are still relevant to society. Amenyah pledged the company’s commitment to the welfare of people with HIV and stated the company would continue to lend its assistance to the inmates of Matthew 25 House.

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